Pronoun-antecedent agreement is a crucial aspect of grammar that can make or break the clarity and coherence of a sentence. In essence, the pronoun must agree with its antecedent in number, gender, and person.

For example, consider the sentence, “Jessica went to the store, and she bought a new dress.” In this sentence, “she” is the pronoun, and “Jessica” is the antecedent. Both are singular, feminine, and third-person, which makes the sentence grammatically correct.

Now, let`s take a look at three similar sentences and figure out which one has the correct pronoun-antecedent agreement:

1. “The team played their best, and they won the game.”

2. “The team played its best, and they won the game.”

3. “The team played its best, and it won the game.”

In sentence 1, we have a disagreement in number between the antecedent “team” (singular) and the pronoun “their” (plural). So, this sentence is incorrect.

In sentence 2, we have a disagreement in gender between the antecedent “team” (neutral) and the pronoun “its” (singular masculine or feminine). Although some may argue that “its” sounds odd, it is technically correct in this context. However, the use of “they” in the second clause is still incorrect, leading to an overall lack of pronoun-antecedent agreement.

Finally, in sentence 3, we have complete congruity between the antecedent “team” and the pronouns “it” and “it.” Thus, the correct answer is sentence 3.

In conclusion, proper pronoun-antecedent agreement is essential for clear and effective communication. Always double-check your sentences to ensure that your pronouns match their antecedents in number, gender, and person. By doing so, you can make your writing more professional and understandable.